Articles | Volume 13, issue 1
Hist. Geo Space. Sci., 13, 83–92, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/hgss-13-83-2022
Hist. Geo Space. Sci., 13, 83–92, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/hgss-13-83-2022
Review article
02 May 2022
Review article | 02 May 2022

Intellectually gifted but inherently fragile – society's view of female scientists as experienced by seismologist Inge Lehmann up to 1930

Lif Lund Jacobsen

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on hgss-2021-20', Anonymous Referee #1, 13 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Lif Lund Jacobsen, 15 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on hgss-2021-20', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Nov 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Lif Lund Jacobsen, 15 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (10 Mar 2022) by Hans Volkert
AR by Lif Lund Jacobsen on behalf of the Authors (10 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (14 Mar 2022) by Hans Volkert
AR by Lif Lund Jacobsen on behalf of the Authors (30 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
The road to success for Danish seismologist Inge Lehmann (1888–1993) – known for her 1936 discovery of the Earth's inner core – was difficult and full of challenges. While she herself refused to accept any notion of gender difference ascribed, society at large was less open-minded. Using newly discovered, unpublished historical documents, this article examines to what degree her gender played a decisive role in her graduate and postgraduate experiences.